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Is your marriage doomed to fail? According to The New York Times and Psychology Today, disagreements about money, especially in the early stages of a relationship, are the top predictor of divorce. Money causes more rifts than disagreements about sex or children. What are couples arguing about, and are there ways to save your marriage?

Financial Hardships Destroy Marriages

“Couples who reported disagreeing about finances once a week were over 30 percent more likely to divorce over time than couples who reported disagreeing about finances a few times per month,” Jeffrey Dew of the National Marriage Project reveals. Moreover, CNBC reports an unforgiving statistic: “Couples with assets of $100,000 or more have lower divorce rates than those with less money.”

The figures make it clear. Arguments about money can ultimately lead to the dissolution of your marriage. In one Canadian study, participants admitted that they were far more likely to forgive spouses for cheating than to compromise on long-standing money problems.

Discuss Money the Right Way, and Save Your Marriage

Before looking into divorce lawyer costs or consulting family law specialists, couples can take steps to manage money the right way — and possibly even save their marriages. For example, U.S. News recommends setting aside specific times to discuss bills, money, and budgeting. This will prevent money and financial stress from creeping into other conversations, which may lead to disagreements and palpable tension.

Other helpful tips include setting and working towards goals together, and being completely open and honest about spending. “Don’t keep money secrets from your spouse. Before laying your souls bare, you and your partner should agree to stay calm, leave accusations at the door and work through financial problems together,” U.S. News continues.

Working out financial disputes is often easier than talking to family law divorce lawyers or uncontested divorce lawyers. Before researching divorce lawyer costs, consider having open, honest, and judgement-free talks about money. Get more here: www.gillaw.com